Croton, Bruttium, Silver Stater

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Dublin Core

Title

Croton, Bruttium, Silver Stater

Subject

Croton, Bruttium (Italy). Silver Stater, 530-480 BCE.
OBVERSE: Tripod lion’s feet; in right field, heron facing left. Retrograde inscription in left field "QPW" (= KROTON), with archaic letter koppa; raised dotted border (quite worn).
REVERSE: Tripod incuse, with incuse border of radiating lines.

Description

Croton was founded as an Achaean colony in 710 BCE. Croton was a very prosperous Greek colony: boasting many Olympic victors, the famous wrestler Milon, the school of Pythagoras (opened in 530 BCE), and, according to Herodotus (3.131), some of the ancient world’s best doctors. Milon, famous for more than his Olympic success, went on to lead a military victory against the powerful Italiot Greek city Sybaris, which ushered in a long era of power and prosperity for his city.

Tripods were often awarded as a prize in the Olympic games and this coin is possibly a reference to the many great athletes to bring one of these back home.

The tripod also recalls the cult of Pythian Apollo, where a priestess would sit atop a tripod and recite oracles.

The incuse design on the back closely mirrors the design on the front. These exact incuse coins are a feature of early coins in the Greek world. The archaic koppa, Ϙ, on the right, OBVERSE side of the coin also points to a very early date. Ϙ ceded to the letter kappa (K) in popularity during the fifth century BCE.

Source

Gift of James and Aneta McIntyre, Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Salem, OR. 2006.010.010

Date

ca. 530 BCE

Rights

Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Format

1.980 cm
7.800 gr

Language

Greek

Type

Coin

Identifier

Kroton oracle

Coverage

This item can be viewed through Hallie Ford Museum of Art's website.

Citation

“Croton, Bruttium, Silver Stater,” Hallie Ford Museum of Art Exhibits, accessed July 22, 2019, https://libmedia.willamette.edu/hfma/omeka/items/show/61.

Geolocation